CHILD OBSERVATION ASSIGNMENT REPORT

Summer 2019

CHILD OBSERVTION REPORT DESCRIPTION:

will write two separate child Observation Reports to fulfill these assignments involving observing a child of different ages (an infant OR toddler age  and an early childhood OR a school-age child) and will then use the child observation notes as a basis for writing a report about the child’s development in the domains. Each report is worth 65 points. It is a course requirement that students complete both observation reports. If a student does not pass in the Observation Reports the notes will not be graded for credit. If a student does not pass in both observations any extra credit points will not be graded as part of the final grade.  Students should use the Child Observation Grading Report Form for the report. Do not make your own form or copy/change the form in any way. Do not pass in a grading form that you have made a PDF document. 

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FINAL CHILD OBSERVATION REPORT DUE DATES: 

Observation One-Choose either the Infant OR Toddler age for the observation report  (4 months- 2.4 years). The Observation Notes Form is Due 7/26 and the Child Observation Report Grading Form is Due 7/29 by 11:30 PM.   Submit the child observation notes form and the child observation report grading form titled with your name and the name of the observation on Moodle using the assignment link.  The observation notes should be written as a separate document using the Observation Notes Form in the Observation folder. After submitting the Observation Notes Form, the notes should then be copied to the end of the Child Observation Report Grading Form that will be submitted later.

Observation Two– Choose either the Early Childhood observation paper-(3 to 5 years) OR  School-age observation paper (6-11 years). The Due Date for the Child Observation Report  Notes is 8/17  by 11:30 PM. The Child Observation Two Grading Form with the notes copied to the end due date is 8/20 by 11:30 PM. Note: If you choose a child who is 2 years four months for Observation One do not do Observation Two on a 3 year old. 

**Note:   All students should do Observation One on a child who is between 4 months and 2 years four months. For Observation Two students who are early childhood education majors should complete the early childhood observation (3-5 years). If you are an education major, you should complete the middle childhood age report (6-11 years) unless you cannot find a child of that age group and then you may do the report on the early childhood age. You may choose the early childhood or middle childhood age child if you are human services or another major. 

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If a student does not have a child for the report, students may visit a referred child care site for an observation of a toddler and/or preschool age child.  Students will need to sign up ahead of time with the course Professor and receive a letter of introduction to set up a visit to the referred child care center. Students will need to contact the center director to set up the observation time after the director is notified by the course Professor. A letter of introduction will need to be brought to the site with the student BHCC ID or driver’s license if not a regular BHCC student. Students should not contact the director of the center unless they have given their name and received a letter of introduction from the course professor. The address for the program will also be posted. 

CHILD OBSERVATION AND REPORT DESCRIPTION:

Audience for this Assignment:

You are to take the role of an observer spending a minimum at least 60 minutes observing each child and recording your observation notes for your report. You may also spend more time with the child and write the observation notes for sections of time.  Each set of instructions below details the ages of children to be observed and other particulars to consider when looking for developmental trends as you observe children of different ages. Possible observation ideas are presented at the end of this assignment as an appendix for your use to assure strong, observational experiences. Set up these observations to get the most out your time to see as much about the child’s development as possible. Review the developmental child development information in your textbook, developmental checklists posted on Moodle or from other reliable resources for further ideas of what to look for before you observe the child. 

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Sites for observations: You may use the following sites for observing your children for this assignment—child’s home, your home, child’s center or school, or other site i.e. playground. Students should not observe children in a public setting that they do not know 

Competencies from the course involved in this assignment:

While this assignment involves most of the competencies listed on the syllabus, the primary objective for this assignment will allow you to meet the following competencies fully as you complete the course. 

Promoting Child development and learning:

1. Knowing and understanding children’s characteristics and needs. (Level I, II, & III)

2. Knowing and understanding the multiple influences on development and learning. (Level I, II, III)

3. Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments. (Level I, II, III)

Family and community relationships:

4. Knowing about and understanding diverse family and community characteristics. (Level I, II, III)

Assessment and evaluation of young children:

5. Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment.

6. Knowing about and using observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches. (Level I, II, III)

Using Developmentally Effective Approaches to Connect

with Children and Families:

7. Understanding positive relationships and supportive interactions as a foundation of work with children. (Level I, II, III)

8. Using a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning practices. (Level I, II, III)

9. Reflecting on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child. (Level I, II, III)

Using Content Knowledge to Build Meaningful Curriculum

10. Knowing and using central concepts, inquiry tools and structures of content area and/or academic disciplines.

11. Using their own knowledge, appropriate early learning standards and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curricula for each child. (Level I, II, III)

Professionalism:

12. Engaging in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice. (Level I, II, III) 

Process and Format for Completing Each of the Reports

The process for observing involves the following:

  • Make an      appointment to observe your child, even if you are going somewhere that is      familiar. Everyone involved should      be informed as to your purpose in the observation. It may be required that you obtain      written permission from a parent to observe the child. Check this ahead of time with the      program, director, and/or the parent. Some programs have a blanket approval for all observations. You      will be changing the child’s name and the names any other children in the      observation or you may use initials.
  • Plan      your observation well ahead of the due date. All sorts of problems can occur with      observations (you don’t get the information you need; the child is sick;      the setting is chaotic the day you arrive, etc.) so you will need extra      time to complete the assignment.
  • Before      you go to observe the child, be clear about the child you are going to      observe and the setting in which you will observe. Who is the child, where will you be      observing, what expectations does the setting have for your interaction      with the child? You do not need to interact with the child to do the      observation. 
  • Be      careful if you know the child. This      relationship often interferes with objectivity. If you are observing a child you are      acquainted with, or know well, plan to be objective and to stay less      emotionally attached than you might normally behave. You should only write      about the behaviors you observed in the observation and not about other      times you spent with the child.
  • Have      your note paper set up ahead of time and plan your observation activities      so you know what you will do when you arrive to observe. Plan for all the      supplies you need (i.e., paper, pencil(s), props to help child with play,      if needed, etc.). If you are observing a child you do not know in a child      care setting, you can observe the child without interacting with them. You      should follow the direction of the staff at the child care center about      how you should interact with the child during the observation time.
  • You      will need to write the observation anecdotal notes using objective      statements using the child observation notes form before the report is      written. The observation notes are used to identify the behaviors and the      domains of development discussed in the observation report. Students      should not write about any behaviors that were not observed during the      observation time. Do not include any subjective statements i.e. child was      angry, happy, sad and do not include your interpretations of the child’s      behavior and development. The notes will also be submitted for credit as      part of the observation report assignment. The notes should be written      into complete sentences from the notes taken during the observation time.   Use      details and be descriptive in your writing so the child’s actions,      behaviors, and activities are clear to the reader.  You do not need to pass in the field notes.      Students should complete the observation notes form that includes the      information about the child and the setting etc. A copy should be      downloaded from the Observation Folder on Moodle.

Format for the Observation Report:

The format for each report is discussed in detail below and you should follow this process for writing the report using the child observation grading form. 

· Use the Child Observation Notes form to submit your observation notes written in complete sentences. The form is found in the Observation Folder.

· Use the Child Observation Report Grading Form to record your child observation report that can be downloaded from the Observation Folder.  

· The Child Observation Report Grading Form has seven sections. The sections are clearly explained below. Using the observation report answer form found in the week folder, follow the topic section headings in the report to ensure that you write all of the report. The answer form also has an overview file that includes the directions for writing the report. Student should follow the directions on the overview form when writing the report. 

· Students will be choosing three behaviors that each span two domains (biosocial, cognitive, language, social, emotional, cognitive, creative and self-help). The self-help domain information is located in the developmental checklist labeled Developmental Birth to Five Adapted and revised by the Mid-State Early Childhood Direction Center, 2012. These three behaviors will be the basis for your report and will be discussed using the same format. Do not use a behavior that is an example of one domain. The format will be discussed below. 

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· The three behaviors will be labeled as Behavior One, Behavior Two and Behavior Three. The domains you can discuss are biosocial, cognitive, language, emotional, social, creative and self-help.  

  Child Observation Report Grading Form

Title: Your Name and Observation One Infant OR Toddler or Observation Two Early Childhood OR Middle Childhood

Students should download the Child Observation Report Grading Form from Moodle

Part One: Introduction 

Introduction

Write an introductory paragraph that will state the purpose of your child observation report. You are observing a child to describe and explain domains of development and how these domains intersect with one another as the child grows.  Give information about the child i.e. age, setting that was listed on the Observation Report Form. You can include other information if important to the observation report i.e. the child is bilingual. Do not describe any behaviors that were not observed in the observation time i.e. you know the child from birth and you discuss the child’s development from the past.

Part Two: Behavior One 

  Behavior One and Two Domains

Choose one of the behaviors that span two domains taken directly from the observation notes. The behavior notes will be labeled as Behavior One. Use the exact notes from the observation written in objective statements and do not interpret or discuss the behavior in this paragraph. Identify two domains that the behavior is an example of.  List the two domains that you will be discussing under the Domain One and Domain Two paragraphs. 

    Behavior One Domain One Quote for Typical Development 

In this paragraph you will state the domain that you will be discussing for Behavior One Domain One.  Then describe at least one quote that is a statement about what the typical development is in that domain for the child’s age and/or developmental level from the text, another reliable source (handout or website) or a developmental checklist. The course text must be used for some of the quotes and use (Santrock, pg. 100) to document where you got the quote in the text. You should also state the title of the handout or the title of the developmental checklist with the age.  A quote that is a definition of the domain being discussed is not accepted as a quote for credit. If you do not use a quote about typical development, your discussion for the child’s development will be your opinion only and you will not get credit for the behavior domain discussion. It can be compared to writing a research paper without using any citations.  More than one quote may be used. Students may get a total of three extra credit points for the entire report.

  Behavior One Domain One Analysis to the Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph the student will discuss how the behavior in the first domain described relates to developmental norms for the age of the child being observed or the quote about typical development from the text, handout or developmental checklist.  Discuss how the observed behaviors are like or unlike the description about typical development that you quoted in the paragraph from the text or other reliable source.  This paragraph should have at least four sentences.

  Behavior One Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph the student will be use the same format as above to discuss Behavior One Domain Two that was identified in the Behavior One paragraph. In this paragraph state the second domain you will be discussing for Behavior One and then list the quote and resource about typical development that you found in the text, handout, or developmental checklist.  

 Behavior One Domain Two Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph describe how the child’s behavior compares to the quote about typical development or is not typical compared to the quote about development. This paragraph should have at least four sentences.

Part Three: Behavior Two

  Behavior Two and Two Domains

Choose the second example of behavior labeled that spans two developmental domains from your observation notes and insert the behavior observation notes taken directly from the notes into the paragraph. State the two domains you will be discussing for Behavior Two

Behavior Two Domain One Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph for Behavior Two Domain Two include a quote about typical development with a resource for where you got the quote.  

 Behavior Two Domain One Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development 

In this paragraph you will then compare the child’s development to the quote about typical development or how the behavior is different from the quotes. This paragraph should be at least four sentences.

 Behavior Two Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph describe Behavior Two Domain Two that includes a quote about typical development with a resource for where you got the quote. You are using the same behavior for Behavior One from above but are using a different domain.

   Behavior Two Domain Two Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development 

In this paragraph compare the child’s development to the quote about typical development or how the behavior is different from the quote.  This discussion should be at least four sentences.

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Part Four: Behavior Three

    Behavior Three and Two Domains

Then continue to the third example of behavior that spans two developmental domains taken directly from the observation notes. Describe the two domains that you will be discussing in the Behavior Three paragraphs.

  Behavior Three Domain One Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph insert a quote about typical development for Behavior Three Domain One and resource from the text, developmental checklist or handout. 

 Behavior Three Domain One Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph include an analysis of how your child’s behavior compares to the statement about typical development or how the behavior is different than the behavior described in the quote. This paragraph should be at least four sentences.

   Behavior Three Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph you will be using the same behavior for Behavior Two but will be discussing a second domain. List the Behavior Three Domain Two you will now be discussing. In this paragraph insert a quote about typical development for Behavior Three Domain Two with a resource from the text, developmental checklist or handout. 

  Behavior Three Domain Two Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph include an analysis of how your child’s behavior compares to the statement about typical development or how the behavior is different than the behavior described in the quote. This paragraph should include four sentences.

Part Five: Summary of the Child’s Growth and Development

Complete your child observation report with a summary statement that restates your purpose drawing from your thesis in the introductory paragraph. “How is the whole child’s development progressing?”  Consider what the observation tells you about the child’s development, what skills would be expected to emerge next, and how teachers and parents can help -the child to grow and develop these skills.  Give examples from your report about the child’s development in the domains. Summarize and discuss the child’s growth development from the child observation report in all of the domains you observed. Give examples of what you learned about the child’s growth and development in the domains that were the most important to you as the observer. This paragraph should have at least 8 sentences.

Part Six: Resources

Students should list all of the resources used for the quotes about typical development. Include the following information for the resource list- the title of a text, author and edition, publisher and date of publication, title of handout and author, title of developmental checklist with source/author and title of website, website address and page resource used from the website with author if an article. You must use your text for some of the quotes.   

Part Seven:  Observation Notes Form

The Observation Notes Form found in the Observation Folder includes the information about the child who is being observed should be inserted at the end of the Child Observation Report Grading Form. The notes should be written in complete sentences using a story format. The statements about the child should be written using objective (fact) not subjective (opinion) language.  The observation notes should be submitted separately as well before the child observation report grading form so the Professor knows the students has completed the observation and has written the notes.

Observation Notes for Observation Assignment

When observing each child for your Observation Assignment, you should record the behavior of the child using objective statements. An objective statement includes what you see the child doing or saying and not any of your interpretations or thoughts about the child’s behavior. You should include the physical, emotional, social and cognitive development including language. This form should be completed for each observation. It will be posted on Moodle in case you need to download it.

Recorder’s Name:  Child’s Name or Initial: Age of Child in Years/Months:  Date of Observation:  Beginning and Ending Time of Observation Setting: People Included in the Observation:  Observation Notes- Include in the notes exactly what you see the child doing including language or sounds if an infant. Use sentences and not phrases. Do not include any of your interpretations about the child’s behavior that will be written as part of the Observation Report. 

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OBSERVATION

Examples for how to use the Headings for the Child Observation Reports for different ages are described under the specific ages below. 

 SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS FOR WRITING ABOUT DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

Child Observation Report #1 Infant OR Toddler Observation Assignment: 

Spend at least 60 minutes observing a child who is an infant or toddler (from 4 months to 2 years four months). Keep a running record of what you are observing the child do in his environment. Include any sounds or words the child makes. Describe the behavior in objective terms described as facts writing exactly what you see the child doing and saying. Do not label the child’s behavior in subjective terms described as opinion. He is happy, selfish etc.  Using these notes transcribe the phases from the notes taken during the observation time into complete sentences and insert the notes into the observation notes form. 

The behaviors you observe should show an intertwining of at least two development domains seen in growth and development, not just one simple behavior. For example, don’t just look at a child beginning to talk (a language/cognitive skill) with a simple babble, but describe the social domain that accompanies this as the infant tries to interact with others (a social/emotional skill), using his new language babbling skills. 

Some areas that might be interesting to look for when you observe (look at the infant toddler chapters in the text to consider what you might see before you go to observe):

· Physical: Body changes in height, weight, and motor movement; gross and/or fine motor skills.

· Cognitive: Sensorimotor levels/behaviors; object permanence skills; memory; language development.

· Social-Emotional: Attachment; temperament; self-awareness; interaction with others; emotions

· Self-help skills: See the developmental checklist of behaviors that are listed by age on the developmental checklist. The skills may be used as a domain i.e. self- feeding can be self-help as well as biosocial motor skill.

Remember to connect your observation to explanations of multiple domains of development. 

For example:

This Behavior Example with two domains for Sally (age 12 months) includes a paragraph with a quote about typical development and then another paragraph about how the child’s behavior compares to the quote about typical development. Two domains for the same behavior are discussed in separate paragraph. Your observation notes will be longer as you will be observing the child for at least 60 minutes.

   Anecdotal Observation Notes 

Sally (12 months) was sitting on the floor in the living room. Using her hands, arms and legs, she pulled herself up to stand balancing on the couch by holding on with both her hands. Smiling Sally held on to the couch cushion and lifted each hand and arm and moved each leg in a side step movement along the outside of couch cushions. Sally then moved to the end table putting out her left hand first and then her right hand. Sally stopped and then paused for 15 seconds. She took her hands off the table at the same time and quickly lowered herself to the floor. She said “Oh!” as she sat on the floor. 

  Behavior One and Two Domains

Behavior One is an example of both biosocial and cognitive development. “Smiling Sally (12 

months) held on to the couch cushion and lifted each hand and arm and moved each leg in a side step movement along the outside of couch cushions.”

 Behavior One Domain One Quote for Typical Development

In Behavior One Domain One, Sally has developed biosocial gross motor skills that are seen in older infants. Infants who are Sally’s age of 12 months are beginning to start to use their walking motor skills. According to the Developmental Checklist Birth to Five from the Mid-State Early Childhood Direction Center, infants from the age of 8-12 months will “walk and holding on to furniture (10-13 months)”. Infants may also “walk two or three steps without support (11-13 months)”. 

 Behavior One Domain One Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development 

Using the gross motor skills for the biosocial domain, walking requires balance and integration of muscle control. Since Sally is now 12 months, she is demonstrating that she has achieved balance in her biosocial motor skills by her ability to walk holding onto the couch and table. Walking by holding onto an object is also an example of integration of motor skills that shows Sally is typically developing in her biosocial skills. Her ability to walk using an object like furniture is the beginning stage of walking independently for an infant who is 11-13 months. She has not yet developed independent walking skills that is also typical of a child who is age 12-14 months. Developmentally Sally could be walking independently at 12 months according to the developmental checklist.

 Behavior One Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

The domain for Behavior One Domain Two is the cognitive domain. Sally also has demonstrated cognitive development by her ability to understand where and how to hold on to the furniture by using motor/muscle control to accomplish the walking task. According to Piaget’s Sensorimotor Sub Stage Four Secondary Circular Reactions (8-12 months), infants will become more deliberate and purposeful in responding to people and objects (Santrock, pg. 160). In Piaget’s Sensorimotor Sub Stage Four, infants will begin to use new adaptions and anticipation also called a means to an end. (Santrock pg. 160) Infants in this Sensorimotor Sub Stage Four will also work hard to achieve a goal. (Santrock, pg. 160).

Behavior One Domain Two Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development

In Behavior One Domain Two, Sally used the furniture to balance herself and then to walk 

sideways holding onto the furniture. The infant’s ability to use her body and objects to accomplish her goal of walking is an example of an infant using an object with a purpose that is 

typical as described in Piaget’s Sensorimotor Sub stage Four Secondary Circular Reactions. 

Since Sally was able to walk using support, her ability to accomplish this skill is an example of 

means to an end. Another characteristic of Piaget Sensorimotor Sub Stage Four 

Secondary Circular Reactions is the infant’s ability to achieve a goal. Sally’s success in walking 

with support is an example of her purposeful achievement of this skill that will later lead to 

independent walking.

Child Observation Report #2-Choose either the Early Childhood Age 3-5 years or Middle Childhood Age 6-11 years

The Early Childhood (Preschool/Kindergarten 3-5 Years) Observation Assignment: 

Spend at least 60 minutes observing a child between the ages of 3 and 5 years of age. Keep a running record of what you are observing the child do in his environment. Include any interaction the child has with other children and adults. Record any language for the child and anyone who is interacting with the child. After the observation time use the Observation Notes Form and write the observation notes in complete sentences using objective terms in a story format. Using three behaviors that span two domains from the observation notes, prepare the child’s observation report form using the same form used for Observation One. 

The behaviors you write about must show an intertwining of these behaviors not just one behavior. For example, don’t just look at a child beginning to express emotions using words (a social emotional skill) but involve the cognitive reasoning the child uses as he interact with others and negotiate his position.

Some areas that might be interesting to look for when you observe (look at the preschool chapters in the text to consider what you might see before you go to observe):

  • Physical: Body changes in height, weight, motor      skills; eating, toileting, and sleeping routines; gross and/or fine motor      skills
  • Cognitive: Language development and usage;      preoperational stages; information processing or memory; modeling of      skills from others; cooperation and following directions/instructions;      creativity in developing ideas beyond what is told to do
  • Social-Emotional: Prosocial behaviors;      empathy; sharing; aggression; gender identification; expression of      emotions (both verbal and physical); play patterns and activities 
  • Self Help Skills-In the developmental      checklists you will find a heading for self-help skills skills that may be      used for this age group. An example would be self-dressing that would be      both a biosocial motor skill but also a self-help skill,

Remember to connect your observation to explanations of multiple domains of development. For example: 

Behavior One Example for Tommy age 4.2 years and his friend Ian age 4.6 years

   Observation Notes

Tommy was playing with friends his classmate Ian in the block corner. They were using unit blocks to build a rectangle shaped building with 4 by 6 blocks (12 by 18 inches).  Using his right hand, Tommy placed the blocks right beside each other in the rectangle formation. Using his right hand Tommy then placed another block directly on top of the previous block to make the block building higher. After the second level was completed,  Tommy and Ian took turns placing the blocks on top of each other to make the building. After placing the block Tommy and Ian said, “It’s your turn now.” 

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  Behavior One and Two Domains

In Behavior One Tommy and Ian took turns placing the blocks on top of each other to make the building. After placing the block Tommy and Ian said, “It’s your turn now.”  This behavior is an example of biosocial development and social (play) development.

 Behavior One Domain One Quote for Typical Development 

From this behavior, I see that Tommy has developed biosocial fine motor skills that are refined and can be used to build elaborate structures using his right hand. In the Skills Builder Fine Motor Development 0-6 Years Handout a child who is 3-4 years will begin to have a strong preference for a lead/dominant hand but switching continues. 

  Behavior One Domain One Analysis to Quote for Typical Development

In this behavior domain description, Tommy is only using one dominant hand (his right hand) and does not switch to his left hand. Tommy is demonstrating his ability to use a dominant hand that is typically developing but does not use his other hand to switch off. The skill of not switching to his less dominant hand demonstrates his ability to only use his dominant hand. This behavior is not typical according to the listed handout that indicates children will use both hands of their body at this age.

     Behavior One Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

The second domain for Behavior One is the social domain. In Mildred Parten’s Social Play Development from 1-6 years, cooperative play is described as children playing together, creating dramas or taking terms. (Kinds of Play class handout). 

Behavior One Domain Two Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development

Tommy demonstrated that he was capable of cooperative play as he and his friend Ian took turns placing the blocks building the block structure. Cooperative play is typical for children who are early childhood age demonstrating the ability to work cooperatively by taking turns to complete a common goal that is described by Mildred Parten.  Tommy has social skills that allow him to share materials and is able to cooperate in developing an idea from thought to an actual product. When playing in a cooperative way, children need to be able to work together and word towards a common goal. Both Tommy and Ian took turns placing the blocks and were able to design the block building together. This skill is a true characteristic of cooperative play.

Child Observation Report Two: School Age Observation (6-11 years): 

Spend 60 minutes observing a child between the ages of 6 and 11 years of age. Do not choose a child that is age 12 as that age begins adolescence.  Keep a running record of what you are observing the child do and say in his environment. Also record any interactions that the child has with other children or adults. Include conversation as well. After the observation time use the Observation Notes Form and write the observation notes in complete sentences using objective terms in a story forma. Using three behaviors that span two domains from the observation notes, prepare the child’s observation report form using the same form used for Observation One.

The behaviors you write about must show an intertwining of these behaviors not just one behavior. For example, don’t just look at a child reasoning and arguing with his teacher about not wanting to do something (a cognitive skill) but involve the relational aspects of the two as they negotiate an outcome of the problem (a social emotional skill). 

Some areas that might be interesting to look for when you observe (look at the school-age chapters in the text to consider what you might see before you go to observe):

  • Physical: Gross or fine motor skills;      eating and sleeping routines
  • Cognitive: Language development and usage; reading      and writing skill development; concrete operational level; information      processing or memory; modeling knowledge and skill levels from peers;      creativity in work and need for conformity
  • Social-Emotional: Moral skills- figuring      out right from wrong; peer relationships; emotional changes in expression      and feelings; preadolescent behaviors

Remember to connect your observation to explanations of multiple domains of development. 

Behavior Observation example for a Middle Childhood age child: Jayne is 6 years old and has just enrolled in a new school in the first grade.

  Observation Notes

  Jayne is sitting in the back corner desk of the classroom and is not talking to any of the other children sitting around her. They did not talk to her. After a few minutes, she started to cry and the teacher went over and asked her, “Why are you crying Jayne?” Jayne said, “Nobody likes me at this school and I miss my old friends.” The teacher then said, “I know you miss your friends but you have new friends here to meet.” The teacher led Jayne to join a small group of girls reading in the book area. The teacher said to the group, “We have a new member of our class who would like to be your friend and read with you today. Her name is Jayne.” The children said, “Hello, Jayne.” The children made a place for her on the rug and they all started to read the books together.

    Behavior One and Two Domains

 The Behavior One that span two domains for the Middle Childhood Observation Report is 

“After a few minutes, she started to cry and the teacher went over and asked her, “Why are you crying Jayne?” Jayne said, “Nobody likes me at this school and I miss my old friends.” The teacher then said, “I know you miss your friends but you have new friends here to meet.” Behavior One is an example of the social domain as well as cognitive domain.

  Behavior One Domain One Quote for Typical Development

In this behavior example for the social domain, children in middle childhood, “peers become 

increasingly important and they are aware of their classmate’s opinions, judgements and 

accomplishments.” (Berger, pg. 395). In addition, “Most children learn in middle childhood how to be a good friend.” (Berger, pg. 396.) 

Behavior One Analysis To a Quote for Typical Development

Children, who are new to a school situation, may feel lonely for familiar peers and frightened about fitting in with peers in the new setting. It is typical development for Jayne to miss her old friends as well as want to seek out new friendships. In middle childhood it is important for children to be accepted by their peers as well as to have friendships. 

 Behavior One Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

This behavior is also an example of cognitive development. “Children want to be liked and they learn faster as well as feel happier when they have friends.” (Berger, pg. 396). In addition, “Social comparison is a consequence of concrete operational thought.” (Berger, pg. 395) Concrete operational thought is Piaget’s term for “the ability to reason logically about direct experience and perceptions.” (Berger, pg. 351)  

Behavior One Domain Two Analysis to Quote for Typical Development

By crying and expressing her feelings of missing her friends, Jayne is aware of the importance of having friends. According to the quotes about cognitive development in middle childhood, children who have friends learn faster. It is important then for Jayne to be able to adjust to her new school and be able to feel like she is part of a new social group. In this behavior domain Jayne is also demonstrating concrete operational thought that is characteristic for this age group. This behavior demonstrates that she is aware of what she is missing by not being able to see her old friends and the fact that she does not yet have friends in her new school. 

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Grading Rubric Description:

Writing Matters: The Writing Standard 

Writing is a process. The more you practice the better you get. That means that you should never hand in a first writing as a final draft. Begin by just writing down your ideas freely as they come to you. Then organize them into paragraphs. Introduce your paper with a paragraph explaining what you are addressing. Then build your argument with well-organized paragraphs. Read the paper aloud. This will help you catch many of your mistakes like missing words or awkward incomplete or run on sentences. Check for spelling, capitalization and grammar. If you aren’t sure, use a dictionary or spell check on the computer. Remember that Bunker Hill offers tutorial support at the TASC and the Language Lab. Use these!! The final product must be neat and legible. 

Check these areas to assure you are getting as many points for writing as possible

  1. Paper is well organized with seven sections      including an introductory paragraph and conclusion as required above. The      paragraphs have a heading for the section listed in the outline for the      report. Ideas are clearly expressed. 
  2. Paragraphs hang together cohesively      around one or two main points. Each paragraph for the analysis has at      least four sentences.
  3. Sentences are complete and well      structured. Capitalization follows standard rules. 
  4. Spelling and punctuation is      standard. 

Process for completing the report 

· Use the observation report form with the headings for the report listed above.

· The report should be word processed 

· The paper must describe and discuss in detail each part for the sections of the paper as outlined above. 

· Write the child observation report using sentences and paragraphs and give as much detail as you are able with the material you have. 

· DO NOT COPY MATERIALS FROM ANOTHER SOURCE. This means not from the Internet, from other students, or another writing. This is plagiarism and is a serious academic offense. Use your own words to express your thoughts. You must document your quote from the text properly and any other information that have come from materials beyond the text or lessons. Use a consistent style to cite these sources. (Author Name, page, #) A reference list should be included at the end with complete information about the references. Students must use the course text for some of the quotes.

· When you are finished with your report first PROOF READ the paper at least twice and fix any errors. This is after you have spell checked and grammar check it at least twice. Then consider the grading rubric below to be assured that you have completed the assignment as required. 

· You will be able to redraft the papers up to one time if there are difficulties with your writing or the concepts expressed in the papers. Due to the time constraints of the session, students will only be able to rewrite the first report. The edited report should be submitted up to 5 days after the due date. You will be notified after submission if you need to do an edit. The observation notes should be submitted ahead of the child observation report but will then be copied to the end of the child observation report form.

· See the Specific Instructions for what to include in the Behavior and Domain paragraphs with the examples of the behavior, quote about typical development and an analysis of how the child’s behavior compares to the typical development. You will not be able to receive a passing grade if you do not include the quote and analysis for the behaviors in the domains.

This rubric describes how you will be graded. Please use the rubric as a guide in writing your paper.  Students must use the Child Observation Report Grading Form for the Report submission.

The point value of each observation report is worth 65 points

ü The anecdotal notes are submitted and graded for credit and must include objective statements describing the child’s behavior written in complete sentences 15 points 

ü The report includes an Introduction that discusses the observation process as well as shares information about the child that is the subject of the observation. 2 points

ü At least 3 examples of behavior observed that describe behaviors from two different developmental domains (3 behaviors @ 2 pts) 6 points

ü A quote(s) from the text/resource specifically relates to the example(s) of behavior that you observed. Documentation must be included for where the quote was found.  (6 quotes @ 3 pts each) 18 points

ü A clear and detailed discussion that compares the behavior observed to the developmental patterns quoted. The analysis should be complete so that someone with no child development experience can understand it. (6@ 3 pts) 18 points 

ü Summary Closing Paragraph about the Child’s Growth and Development 4 points

ü Resource List that includes specific information about the resources used for the quotes about typical development (i.e. text, author, publisher, date of publication)  2 Points

ü Points will also be taken off for spelling or punctuation. Please edit your report by conducting a spell check prior to passing in the report.

*Note: 

Students who include more than the required 6 quotes for typical develop for the behavior domains will receive one extra credit for any additional quote up to 3 points for each observation. One point will be added for each additional quote that relates to the section on the child’s development in the domains being discussed. Quotes that are definitions for domains will not get extra credit. Students who pass in the report late will have 5 points taken from the total number of points. The second observation report will not be accepted for late submission as it is due during the last week of the course. Students will have the opportunity to edit the first observation report if the format has not been used or the student has issues related to the report content or writing.

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